Making Sense of World Plug and Sockets Around the Globe

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My better half departed off to London and now Cornwall for a 2 week sojourn a few days ago, a journey along the craggy British coast. Like me, she tends to be joined at the finger tips to her laptop, but this trip out she decided to go without her computer and rely only on her iPhone. She still needed the proper power adaptor for English power plugs, ending up purchasing one of those all-in-one plug pack solutions. For those of you might be taking off on your own European vacation Griswald style (or anywhere else around the globe for that matter), here's a chart via BookofJoe for those of us who travel with a bit of tech luggage everywhere we go...Further details about which plugs and electrical systems in use in most countries of the world, we highly recommend taking a look at this indepth table listing voltage, frequency and plug: "The voltages listed here are the “nominal” figures reported to be in use at most residential or commercial sites in the country or area named. Most electrical power systems are prone to slight variations in voltage due to demand or other factors. Many former 220 V countries have converted or are in the process of converting to the EU standard of 230 V. Generally, this difference is inconsequential, as most appliances are built to tolerate current a certain percentage above or below the rated voltage. However, severe variations in current can damage electrical equipment.

The electric power frequency is shown in the number of hertz (cycles per second). Even if voltages are similar, a 60-hertz clock or tape recorder may not function properly on 50 hertz current. All systems described here use alternating current (AC). The plug types listed indicate all types known to be in use in that country. Not all areas of a country may use all types of plugs listed for that country, since there may be regional differences based on the power system in a certain area." -via Kropla.com

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