Master the Mix: How To Combine Mismatched Multiples (So They Don't Look Crazy)

Master the Mix: How To Combine Mismatched Multiples (So They Don't Look Crazy)

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Jennifer Hunter
Oct 27, 2014

If you're more mix-it-up than matchy-matchy, listen up. We know you like to break the rules, but there are still a few basic guidelines to mastering a cool, goes-together look that has just the right amount of clash.

The knack to cohesive mixing is to keep continuity in at least two areas so the look doesn't get too out of control. Check out four examples that get it right:

• The mix: Mismatched dining chairs

The trick: Though the era and silhouette of these chairs are different, they all stick to the same color palette (color-blocked color palette to be specific) and seat style.

•The mix: Frames in your gallery wall or table display.

The trick: These frames are all different colors, but they stick to a similar (rectangular) shape and low-profile width.

•The mix: Mismatched bedside tables

The trick: These two bedside tables are both rectangularly shaped and roughly the same size but their color, materials and visual weight are drastically different.

•The mix: Tableware

The trick: The rounded shapes and similar color palette of this eclectic design work together, while the multiple patterns and different plate and bowl styles pull it slightly off kilter.

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