No Entryway, No Problem: 50+ Solutions for Small Spaces

No Entryway, No Problem: 50+ Solutions for Small Spaces

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Julia Brenner
Jan 23, 2017
(Image credit: Design*Sponge)

Not having a proper entryway to place keys and mail and store shoes and outerwear is both a storage and aesthetic Jenga puzzle. We've rounded up over 50 ideas—and lots of gorgeous photos—in 10 of our favorite posts to help you win the ultimate prize in no-entryway-Jenga: a functional and attractive place to drop your stuff when you get home.

(Image credit: iHeart Organizing)

The ever-popular HEMNES shoe cabinet is a great solution for your entryway. Jen from iHeart Organizing painted her cabinet gray and added vintage-style ring drawer pulls for a customized look.

(Image credit: Refinery29)

The photo above, from Refinery29, is actually a corner of a closet, but there's plenty of inspiration here for a small-space entryway. The shelf is a great catch-all for little things like keys, wallet and mail, and the hooks on the hanging rod below keep purses neatly organized.

(Image credit: Dezeen)

This teeny landing strip from Dezeen is little more than a spot to stash mail and keys, but it could be an important step in controlling the amount of clutter that gets into your home. The shelf above the radiator is an especially clever touch. A narrow wall-mounted shelf (or even a picture ledge) can hold mail and keys in even the smallest of entryways. With hooks underneath, it can hold bags and jackets, too.

(Image credit: Alvhem)

A hook-plus-shelf combo is a smart and simple way to keep organized in your foyer. This itty-bitty entry uses hooks installed underneath a shelf, giving it a clean look and giving jackets a little more room to hang than with just using wall hooks, and makes the absolute most of available space. Alvhem via My Scandinavian Home.

Even if you aren't working with a lot of space, having a proper place to put your mail is crucial to organizing both your life and entryway. An acrylic tray table creates the illusion of extra room while providing enough room for a fun letter tray or two. Now you'll be sure to remember your electric bill and maybe even your sunglasses.

(Image credit: Design*Sponge)

Your entry surface might be the end of the media unit that houses your TV, a large bedside table, or a tiny wall-mounted shelf, as seen above from Design*Sponge. To optimize the area, consider adding a tray or bowl to catch "entry debris" and a small hook on a nearby wall for a bag or coat.

(Image credit: Design*Sponge)

Wall-mount everything you can. The landing strip in this 1950s home, seen on Design*Sponge, is minimal but ultra efficient. By hanging a shelf on brackets and a mirror, the residents take up hardly any floor space.

(Image credit: Kalb Lempereur)

A Paris apartment designed by Kalb Lempereur takes a simple dowel-style coat hook and multiplies it, creating not only a visual feast but also a sort of peg-board rig that can be used to hold up a small shelf, too.

(Image credit: VT Wonen)

VT Wonen placed false fronts and handles on basic bins to upgrade the look on these entryway bench, and add storage.

(Image credit: Marla)

Marla's 400-square-foot home didn't have much of an entryway. Her front door opens directly into her kitchen, so she knew she'd have to fit an entryway in a small spot. "I love the simplicity of our entryway, yet it packs a lot in a tiny space! The console of small drawers makes it easy to organize—a drawer for my extra bag items, one for some utility things, and a few for the kitchen."

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