NYC Stroller Competition - Last Day!

NYC Stroller Competition - Last Day!

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Maxwell Ryan
Oct 14, 2004

Roller Wars. Dear readers, The Bugaboo has taken the lead after an strong start by those opposed to strollers in the first place. Maclaren is flip flopping in the middle of the pack, while Valco never wavers at the bottom.....

Below you will find photos and arguments for each entry while voting takes place here:

Single Stroller Voting
Double Stroller Voting.....
(Photo: Weber Gogo Trekking Stroller)

Our purpose is to anoint the best (say what you think!) and to help those who know nothing to know a little more. Feel free to leave your comments below. This post will run through Thursday. MGR

VALCO - @ $349

Laurie:
My ideal twin stroller would be the Valco if I liked the look of it more. It has an all aluminum chassis and it moves effortlessly; I have resisted the expensive puchase because it is a little too flashy - kinda like gold fixtures in a bathroom.

MACLAREN TECHNO - @ $250

Liz:
If you live in the city, your stroller will be your life. Spend the money on a good one. The Maclaren Techno has done me right for 3 years. Bugaboos look like a waste of money to me because they don't seem easily portable. I used the subway a lot for the first 2 years and got used to carrying my baby, my bag and my stroller without trouble (you have to fold the whole thing up at certain stations). I've never tried one, but the Bugaboo (although great-looking) seems really impractical and unwieldy for the subway. MaClarens are great for their handles--easy to maneuver with one hand.

MACLAREN VOLO - @ $50

Movo:
I like the Maclaren Volo for your everyday strolling...

BUGABOO (envy)- @ $720

Peter:
I agree with the "spend the money" advice from the first person, but not on the Maclaren Techno. I have the Techno XT and it is badly built. Spend the money on the Bugaboo!! It is the best stroller! Most of my friends spent the extra to get the Bugaboo and I regret that I didn't.

MOUNTAIN BUGGY - @ $350

Jamie:
Mountain Buggy pros:
* Very easy to push - low rolling resistance.
* Very easy to maneuver - the way the pivoting front wheels work enable you to turn this thing around within the space that it takes up when still.
* Absorbs sharp bumps.
* Full width bar enables one handed pushing - also helped by low rolling resistance and excellent tracking - the front wheels have a castor that works much better than the MC

Jamie: UB cons:
* Heavy - do not even try taking this on the subway, my wife and I did and nearly broke our backs.
* About 2 inches too wide - it does look wider than it really is but those couple of inches over the McClaren twin do make a difference in some NYC stores.
* Folding is not a single handed operation - you cannot do this with a child on your arm.
* Folding does not make it much smaller - it will take up nearly all the trunk space of a compact to mid-size car

KOLCRAFT - @ $20

Movo:
.... but I still say the best cheap find is the Kolcraft no frills stroller usually selling for $20 or so. As an "I'm not 20 anymore" mom of two I will just say this is the one stroller that is lightweight enough to haul around on public transportation. Caveat-Insist on the cheapest one they make. The upgraded Kolcrafts are not lovely.

PHIL & TED'S E3 - @ $300

Alice: Phil and Ted's E3 stroller has big wheels that glide effortlessly over bumpy city streets and curbs. It's narrow enough to maneuver through the stores, and you can buy an attachment that turns it into a double stroller--with the 2nd child behind the first (so that Patrick won't be inconvenienced any more). (Extra-cute emoticon goes here.)

MACLAREN TWIN - @ $349

Jamie:
We've got both a Maclaren Twin and the Urban Buggy Double. We are getting rid of the urban buggy.

Maclaren Twin Traveller pros:
* Can be folded easily with one child on your arm - use a combination of hand and foot release then fold straight down with one hand.
* Folds to a fairly small size - never a problem on the subway in terms of the space it takes up when folded.
* Just light enough to be carried by two people up and down subway stairs

MC cons:
* Ride is awful - bumps that the UB rolled easily over send a jarring shock through the whole frame that obviously is not good for your children.
* Despite its light weight it is not as maneuverable as the UB by a long shot.
* separate handles that allow for compact folding do not allow for one handed pushing.

Summary:
If you need to travel on the subway with your two kids this beats the UB hands down. This is the main reason to buy this.

MOUNTAIN BUGGY URBAN DOUBLE - @ $490

AK:
We have the Mountain Buggy Urban Double in the city. It is the easiest stroller to manuver and in the event you need to go on grass it blows the Bugaboo away. It also folds nice and flat for transport. I am glad that we tried it and got rid of the wimpy wide mclaren we had before.

Raquel:
What about us New Yorkers with two babies. Any manufacturer can make a one seater that turns on a dime but what about the double. The most stylish and the best manuverable has to be the Mountain Buggy Urban Double. See it at mountainbuggy.com. In my opinion it is better looking than the bugaboo and pushes like buttah.

BYE BYE BABY - @ $924

Shannon:
Forget getting it in and out of a New York apartment, but I just saw a six-seater Bye Bye Baby buggy ($924 at Sam's Club) rolling down Park Avenue South. Between that and the three Jack Russels on a leash, it was like a cuteness vortex for a minute there.

SLINGS & BACKPACKS

In keeping with the whole AT idea of simplicity, I highly recommend a sling for toting your tot around the city. Though I don't live in the city and I understand the necessity of a stroller for some trips, for short trips, slings are great. Plus you get the added bonus of bonding time with your baby (read up on the benefits of "babywearing" at www.askdrsears.com)and your baby gets the stimulation of seeing more of the world. I used a Koala brand sling with my son, but have switched to the Maya Wrap (www.mayawrap.com -- click on the News and Info link to see who's using them) with my daughter, as it has a pocket for a burp cloth, teething toy, my keys, wallet, etc. Your baby can also nap or nurse (though I have never mastered that) in the sling. And unless your child is a very heavy toddler, it's not uncomfortable at all and it still leaves your hands free without having to manuever a bunch of gear.

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