On a Scale From Light to Dark...How Green Are You?

On a Scale From Light to Dark...How Green Are You?

Amber Byfield
Oct 20, 2008

102008_howgreen.jpgHere at Re-Nest, we talk a lot about how every small green move is still a move in the right direction. We point out that whether you're saving a couple of gallons of water a month, or you've completely moved off the grid, it's still making a difference—we applaud them all! Whether you're just turning an earthy shade of khaki, or you're a tree-hugging activist who boycotts all things that consume petrol, it's highly commendable.

So this online article from the New York Times last week caught our eye by bringing up this point: "What shade of green are you, exactly?"

This article points out that all of us showcase our green-ness at different levels. Some of us are very public about it, letting our coworkers know that, "Yes, this is organic free-range chicken on top of these home-grown greens and I'm wearing shoes made from recycled bike tubes and fair-trade cotton." Others take a quieter approach, swapping out old-school lightbulbs with CFLs at home and taking reusable bags to the grocery store.

The NYT article points out that the "dark greens" are still viewed by some as crazy fanatics. Others call them catalysts who embrace small carbon footprints.

If we had to assign a shade of green to ourselves, we think we'd fall at a pretty solid kelly—darker than mint, but lighter than forest. We're vocal about how we've reduced our footprint by using public transportation, growing a little bit of our own food in a container garden, shopping local, recycling as much as we can, and greening all of our habits. We think about how each decision can become more sustainable...but we haven't sold our cars and we probably won't be "off the grid" for quite a while, as we still rent an apartment. So, we'd consider ourselves somewhere in the middle of the green spectrum, but always aspiring to become darker green.

So, we want to know...where are you on the green scale? And do you plan on moving around from shade to shade?

Photo by Jonathan Alcorn for the New York Times

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