Painting Tips Straight From the Pros: BEHR's Applications Lab

Painting Tips Straight From the Pros: BEHR's Applications Lab

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Jennifer Hunter
Oct 1, 2014
(Image credit: BEHR)

When the guys at BEHR give you painting tips, you listen. Then you share them. After all, they paint all day, every day so they know a thing or two about it. Do you know how much paint you should be applying to your tools? Why have you been told to apply paint to the wall in a "V" or "W" shape? And just what the heck is a weenie roller? I found out.

Tools:

Like almost everything else in life, painting requires good tools. Skimping on quality brushes and rollers will almost always come back to haunt you in the end. These guys recommend brands like Wooster or Purdy. If you're using acrylic or latex paint (and you probably are), choose a synthetic bristle brush. It's worth the money to buy a roller with a locking frame (which will keep your cover from slipping off the handle mid-roll) and while you're at it, pick up some lint-free roller covers. Alternatively, you can save a few bucks by buying regular roller covers and prepping them with a few swipes on a large piece of tape to remove the fuzzy stuff. A standard size with a 3/8'' nap is right for almost all projects but for really tight spaces, try a smaller sized "weenie roller" to get more control. Finally, their most important tool tip: save your back and buy a roller pole. You'll be glad you did.

(Image credit: BEHR)

Technique:

Here's the thing about painting: you have to use plenty of paint! Load your roller really, really well. It should take you several minutes to fill your roller. These guys even say, "Be a little obsessive about it." If you need to use pressure to get the paint on the wall, it means you haven't loaded your roller properly. Dip your roller into the well and use the upper paint tray (the textured part) to work paint into your roller nap and remove the excess. Then do a couple of rolls onto an extra board so when you start painting your surface, the paint will go on really smoothly.

(Image credit: BEHR)

Begin with an angle sash brush and "cut in" to the edge of your wall. You may want to use tape (I always do) but these pros just eyeball it (and have very steady hands). Then pick up your (generously loaded) roller. You may have heard advice about rolling a "V" or "W" shape on the wall which works just fine but really, they say, is simply a way to teach people to paint in shoulder-width sections. Apply paint floor-to-ceiling in three-foot sections, always keeping a wet edge (so each section will blend seamlessly with the next). Remember to use enough paint! Paint is between 40%-60% water which will evaporate, so to get proper coverage, be generous. Once you've covered your section with paint, do a "wet roll" or go over the area one more time to smooth out any edges or patchiness before you move on.

(Image credit: BEHR)

Now the only thing left to do is sit back and enjoy your flawlessly painted wall! My thanks to BEHR for the eye-opening tips!

This is not a sponsored post but my thanks for BEHR for providing my transportation and accommodations during this trip.

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