Peek Inside Faith Hill & Tim McGraw's Piece of Paradise in the Bahamas

Peek Inside Faith Hill & Tim McGraw's Piece of Paradise in the Bahamas

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Tara Bellucci
Jun 5, 2017

Even celebs underestimate the amount of time that goes into the building process. When country music superstars Faith Hill and Tim McGraw bought a private 20-acre island in the Bahamas, they had no idea how much work they'd have to do to make it habitable. Case in point: they purchased the property in 2003, and they didn't move in until 2012. Stars, they're just like us (okay, maybe not exactly).

In L'île d'Anges—their name for the island, which is French for the "island of angels"—they took on a bit more than they realized initially. The couple tells Architectural Digest:

"We were a little bit naive, possibly," Hill admits, "as to what——"
"——what the undertaking really meant," McGraw concludes.
"We set out to build a house. We had no idea we had to build everything else." She laughs. "We basically had to build a little town."
"You've got to have staff houses," he says, meaning shelter for the original construction workers as well as the current caretakers. "You've got to have infrastructure."
"You've got to have water."
"Water. Electricity. You don't quite put all that together at first."

The wait seems to have been worth it; the "house" is actually a series of of eight distinct "pavilions," connected by thatch-roofed loggias, the epitome of indoor outdoor living.

"You can bathe outdoors or climb a tower and feel that you're being lifted up into the air," says Bobby McAlpine, one of the property's architects. "All these sort of romantic ideas, we got a shot at doing here, and we took them."

"We wanted to feel connected to the outside," Hill says. "When the breeze comes through the room, it's just life-changing."

The inside of the property is minimal and inspired by the nature outside, mostly white with any color coming from "those beautiful Bahamian waters."

"We wanted everything to feel a bit cobbled together," says interior designer Ray Booth, "as if you washed up on the beach and had to figure out a way" to decorate the house.

Check out more photos and read the full article in the July 2017 issue of Architectural Digest.

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