Survey Says: People Would Rather Do This Dirty Chore Than Shop In Person

Survey Says: People Would Rather Do This Dirty Chore Than Shop In Person

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Kenya Foy
Mar 18, 2017

In-store shopping has become a huge pain in the butt to the degree that many consumers are willing to go to extreme lengths to get out of doing it. That said, the phrase "shop 'til you drop" may very well be on its way to becoming obsolete, at least according to a study that claims people would rather wash dishes than shop in person.

That's actually saying a lot about how consumers feel about the brick-and-mortar experience, considering the fact that doing the dishes is generally regarded as one of the least favorite household chores.

A report by Capgemini Consulting that polled 6,000 consumers and 500 retail leaders found that people are beginning to regard the act of physical shopping as futile and a much less pleasant experience than making purchases online. So much so that nearly a third of participants would choose dishes over shopping.

(Image credit: Capgemini Consulting)

Basically, consumers are willing to suck it up and seek out easier ways to do fewer dishes if it means they can permanently replace perusing the store aisles and racks with scrolling and clicking.

"Our latest research shows that shoppers are now seeing less value and pleasure in this core element of the physical retail experience," the report reads. "A key reason for this declining value is that consumers now expect a physical user experience that replicates what they find online, from expecting goods to be in stock to being able to choose from multiple delivery options. Consumers wish to use technology to help them engage with the store at every step of the shopping journey."

Additionally, 59 percent of those surveyed would be willing to make purchases from sites Google Express, Facebook, with 57 percent expressing a desire for brick-and-mortar establishments to "serve a higher function" than simply selling products.

So far, the closest we've come to experiencing the convenience of online shopping in physical form is the forthcoming Amazon store with no checkout lines, but if consumers have their way, we'll need only a computer, an internet connection and a pair of dishpan hands to make purchases.

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