Planning Ahead: Converting Twin Beds to Bunks

Our recent roundup of twin beds elicited many comments from readers convinced that twins don't make much sense because kids might outgrow them. But what about shared rooms and space constraints? My twins share a room and are perilously close to climbing out of their cribs, so we are looking at big kid beds. For our home and needs, it makes sense to buy twin beds that can be converted to bunk beds in a few years. In the course of shopping around we have learned a few things.

Not all bunks fit the bill. Two of my favorite modern bunk beds, the Oeuf Perch Bed and Argington's Uffizi Bunk Bed, convert to a loft and a standalone twin. Both are beautiful but non-starters for siblings too young for a loft.

The magic is in the headboards and footboards. All of the twin to bunk options I have seen work by switching the head and footboards; as standalone beds, each takes a headboard and a footboard. When bunked, the bottom bed takes both headboards and both footboards are switched to the top bed.

Plan long term. A while back we heard from a reader who wanted to buy half of a modular system and add on down the road. Readers were quick to point out the risk of discontinued designs or finishes, or a company going out of business. For a singleton the recommendation was to buy the complete system and store half for future use. In our case, we are thinking long and hard about what our girls will need as they grow. A trundle? Underbed storage? Any options we want for future use will be purchased now.

Some of the separable bunk beds we are contemplating are the New Mix Bunk Bed by Young America (it would be even better if the New Mix Spindle was a bunkable bed), the Riley Bunk Bed from Room & Board, and the Simple Bunk from Land Of Nod.

Have you purchased bunk beds that were used first as standalones?

(Image: Young America)

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