A Question is the Answer: Record Player Collectibles

A Question is the Answer: Record Player Collectibles

Gregory Han
Feb 14, 2011

Pardon me while I put on my old man hat, but after last night's refresher course of pop music via the Grammys, I feel like I'm more than happy to continue being admittedly oblivious in a geriatric sense and continue listening to artists that don't require the infantile utterances of "Gaga" or "Bieber" in any sentence. I'd much rather enjoy the sounds of musicians who are…well…actually musicians. And also ones with an appreciation for things like vintage record players, like this small 6 player collection discovered while doing research about a current favorite Southern Cali artist who goes by the moniker, Question.

Via Question's site, Analogue Studies:

Here's a look at 6 vintage record players in my collection. The first one is an antique 1920's Victrola Phonograph. I bought it from its original owner who restored it himself. Next is the G.E. Wildcat which was released in the late 60's and early 70's. My awesome wife gave this to me for christmas last year. She found this model in immaculate condition at an antique store and its seriously brand new! The next one is the Califone 1010, I picked this up since this was the same model they used back in middle school and it was a bit nostalgic.


The first portable is the 1960 Japanese issue Toshiba GP-41E. This red player caught my eye with its modern shape. It's also smaller than the portable players in its era. The next portable is the Columbia GP-3 which was also a Japanese release. The first version came in a cream and red colorway, and this clear case was made in limited quantity. And finally, the smallest of the pack is the 1970 Naco Portable. One of the features that made this player stand out besides its size -is that it isn't belt-driven. The Naco runs direct drive by a rubber spindle that grips the record and spins it at 33 or 45 speed. This was actually a great find, it was still in its original box and came complete with manual and documents.


Nothing beats the warm sound of records. Imagining how they did it back in the early days is an experience in itself. Enjoy!

Songs: (in order)

  • Moonlight Serenade - Glen Miller Orchestra
  • One Note Samba - Stan Getz ft. Astrud Gilberto
  • September 13 - Eumir Deodato
  • Harem Hendoo - Al Hirt
  • Scrabble - Rene Costy
  • Funky Nassau - The Beginning Of The End

Question, aka Mark Cruz of San Diego, also recently gave a tour of his home studio over at creatives workspace spotlight site, All Work Know Play, which we highly recommend for tech and beat junkies out there looking for guidance/inspiration of how to organize a space filled with gears up to the grill. It's always fascinating to get a glimpse into how DJs organize their spaces, simply for the fact they usually have loads of gear and music to keep organized [hint: have a storage space dedicated for everything].

Compared to the other tours on the site, we're going to have to say Mark's is easily the most organized and thought out, thanks to the use of tired shelving above and below his workspace (we're going to attribute that to the fact he's also a designer). The oversized mustache is optional, but it's advisable to peep Question's album, Study Guide, if you like what you've seen and heard above.

Other turntable and DJ posts from our archives:

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