RainXchange: Modular Underground Rainwater Cistern

Green Architect

Rainwater cisterns are a great way to collect large amount of water to reuse in your home are garden — unfortunately most cisterns are very big, have a large footprint and typically don't look very good... It's this problem that RainXchange is going to solve: underground rainwater collection. It easily integrates into landscaping and is perfect for those who don't like the look of a cistern or who are tight on space.

The Aquascape RainXchange is a subsurface rainwater harvesting system that filters and stores rainwater with zero-footprint. By using a fountain-like feature integrated into your landscape, the water is constantly recirculated to prevent stagnation and bacteria growth.

The RainXchange system works by connecting your downspouts to a collection tank, which is then directed to a series of modular underground basins where the water is filtered and stored. The basins are modular to accommodate a variety of site applications and sizes. To keep the water constantly moving it is recirculated through a decorative pond or water fountain that is run by a very high efficiency pump. The system can be installed under landscaped areas or even under permeable pavers as additional means of capturing stormwater. The RainXchange system can be used with a simple hand-held hose irrigation or even connected to more complex irrigation systems. Any water overflow or excess is simply redirected and absorbed by underground soil.

According to Aquascape 1-inch of rainfall on a 2,000 square-foot residential roof generates 1,250 gallons of water that can be reused; that same roof in a region receiving 30-inches of annual rainfall generates 41,000 gallons of reusable water. That's a lot of water to reuse!

The benefits are numerous: a decorative water feature instead of a large ugly cistern, and rainwater collection with no above-ground footprint. Collecting rainwater not only reduces the need for fresh potable water for landscaping and grey water uses, but it also reduces demand on municipal water systems.

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(Images via RainXchange)