Rainy Day Escapes: Furniture Appreciation at the Museum

Rainy Day Escapes: Furniture Appreciation at the Museum

During this month of "escapes," we're planning a lot of Plan B activities in the event that this awful rain continues through fall. While on vacation in Atlanta, we spent a rainy afternoon in the gorgeous High Museum of Art and stumbled across these lovely furniture exhibits — both Mid-Century and 19th Century American (after the jump)...

This exhibit reminded us of a Design Within Reach showroom at first but then the formal arrangement made us really slow down and appreciate these familiar mid-century pieces for the works of art that they are. The information plaque read as follows:

During the economic boom in the U.S. after WWII, the demand for comfortable, affordable furniture rose as soldiers returned home. Technological advancements made in the 1940s, coupled with Americans' increasingly relaxed lifestyles, allowed designers to experiment with form and color, which were often inspired by nature. In the aftermath of the war, the organic shapes of furniture design symbolized affordability, security, and prosperity.

And around the corner was this lovely line up of classic American furniture from the late 19th Century, reminding us that traditionally, our national aesthetic stems from a very simple, clean, — dare we say — minimal sensibility. The contrast was wonderful.

Museums are a great way to get out and make the most of a rainy summer day and inspiration is everywhere! These exhibits were down in Atlanta at the High Museum but the Museum of Fine Arts here in Boston has a wonderful collection of early Colonial furniture, ancient textiles, ceramics from many eras, and much more than just paintings. The MFA also has a new, modern addition under construction that's worth checking out.

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