The Fall Green Cure: On Floorplans and Guided Imagery

The Fall Green Cure: On Floorplans and Guided Imagery

Jonathan B.
Sep 21, 2007

Reading or drawing a floorplan is like learning a foreign language. In fact, we've heard about universities that used to give foreign language credit to architecture students in recognition of this special skill.

Drawing a floorplan is part of Week 2 of the Green Cure, and Stringy's right on top of it.

If you're wondering how to begin, or what to put on your floorplan, here are a few tips, starting with a little guided imagery.

Office floorplan - before• Imagine your home is suddenly shrunken down to the size of a loaf of bread. Fortunately, you happen to be outside at the time. Pick up your newly teensy house.
• Imagine that you have a large knife, with which you're going to slice your home into horizontal pieces, one for each floor. (Remember, this is just in your imagination.) If you only have one floor, you get to skip this step.
• Now imagine putting each floor of your home on a counter, so that the floor is flat on the counter.
• Pick a spot about halfway up the walls, or above the desks and tabletops in your shrunken, imaginary house.
• Grab the imaginary knife and slice in half, like you're making a layer cake. Set the top half aside.
• Look down. There's your floor plan.

Now your task is to transfer what you're looking at to paper... and to preserve some sense of scale, so that when you draw your ideal plan, you can know that everything will fit into the room.

The easiest way to do this is to measure the outside edges of your home and transfer these measurements to graph paper. (Let each square equal one foot.) Then sketch in the furniture. You'll find that with practice you'll be able to get the proportions right for everything you're drawing in the room as long as you've drawn the outline of the room correctly.

Floor plan newbies: does this method work for you? Expert floor plan drawers: what are your tricks?

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