Why You Should Keep a Pay-As-You-Go Phone As a 2nd Line

When you update your phone, your carrier, or your contract, do you immediately let everyone in your contact list know that you have a new number? A couple of months ago, I updated my cell phone to a smartphone. And while the new phone performs well, there are reasons why I decided to keep my old pay-as-you-go "dumb" phone around...

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When I upgraded to a new phone, I basically did it on the down low. I only gave my new number to my bosses, family, close friends, and a few others. There are plenty of reasons why I was quiet about my new number, mostly because I didn't want to receive texts in the middle of the night from spammers nor acquaintances. Let's not even talk about the calls I've gotten at 4AM while peacefully sleeping! So keeping my old pay-go phone as a second line was a calculated move:

1. Having the pay-as-you-go phone as a second line basically allows me to create a barrier between me and anyone annoying who has my old phone number. It's like one of those junk email accounts you keep around to filter out annoyances.

2. When your phone gets calls or texts in the middle of the night and there's nothing you can do to change this, then a new number will definitely give you some peace of mind. I haven't been woken up by my phone since I changed.

3. Just like a dummy email account, you can give out your second line's number to anyone you don't want contacting you on your main line. It's kind of like the mythical 555-5555.

4. Checking received calls daily or weekly is usually enough to address any matters that arise from your second line.

5. I've tested a few resting surfaces, and have discovered that if my new phone rests on a book, the vibration won't wake me up. If it rests on the wooden floor, it will. You can try and test these different places to see which is optimal to the way you use your phone.

MORE CELL PHONES ON APARTMENT THERAPY:
&bull:Improve Your Cell Phone Reception
Smartphones As Your Primary Alarm Clock

(Images: Flickr member Steve Wilhelm licensed for use under Creative Commons and Flickr member Strange Librarian licensed for use under Creative Commons)

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