Red Knit Cap Girl To The Rescue by Naoko Stoop

Children's Book Review

My family's introduction to Red Knit Cap Girl was purely by chance. My daughter is obsessed with the moon and my wife found a great print of a cute little red-clad girl sitting on a tree branch with a white bunny, staring up at a full moon. It is prominently displayed in a frame on her dresser. So imagine my surprise when I picked up Red Knit Cap Girl To The Rescue and saw that familiar face, along with her friend the bunny, flying along in a hang glider made from what looks to be a page from a paperback book. Needless to say, I was intrigued.

The first thing you notice when opening Red Knit Cap Girl To The Rescue is the texture of the drawings. Stoop paints on plywood and allows the wood grain to peek through, lending a natural touch to each illustration. This technique seems to work no matter what the setting is—it makes sand look grainier, the sky deeper and somehow gives the ocean a sense of organic movement. Her relatively simple (yet wonderfully satisfying) characters and sparse details make each landscape a major focus of the story.

The story itself is sweet. An adventurous girl, her woodland friends, a stranger in need and a journey across the sea. What more does a child need? Not much— unless of course you throw in a talking moon. That sealed the deal in my household.

Title: Red Knit Cap Girl To The Rescue
Author: Naoko Stoop
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company (2013)
Naoko Stoop on Etsy

Age group: Three to six
Best for kids who: love brave heroines and adventure

Find the book at your local library, independent bookstore, or Amazon:
Red Knit Cap Girl To The Rescue by Naoko Stoop

Apartment Therapy Media makes every effort to test and review products fairly and transparently. The views expressed in this review are the personal views of the reviewer and this particular product review was not sponsored or paid for in any way by the manufacturer or an agent working on their behalf. However, the manufacturer did give us the product for testing and review purposes.

(Image credits: Carrie McBride)

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