Design Lessons: New Ways to Arrange, Hang, and Display Artwork

Design Lessons: New Ways to Arrange, Hang, and Display Artwork

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Nancy Mitchell
Mar 26, 2015
(Image credit: Domaine Home)

We'd never want to live without art, but deciding how and where to hang and display it can be a bit tricky. In a gallery wall? Centered over the dining table? What's too high? What's too low? If you're decorating and at a bit of a loss as to where to place your pieces — or just looking to rejigger your space a bit — take a look at these nine ways to re-think your art.

Above: Big pieces don't have to be the only art in the room. This synthesis of an oversized canvas and a (sort of) gallery wall works surprisingly well. Spotted on Domaine Home.

(Image credit: Nordic Design)

Centering this canvas over the sofa would've been the conventional choice — and a much less interesting one. Try moving your art around a bit; you may find that an asymmetrical arrangement is just the thing to add a little more life to the room. This piece is also hanging quite low in the space — but the low placement makes sense because the art has a relationship with the furniture in the room. From Nordic Design.

(Image credit: Elle Decor)

A larger painting, surrounded by smaller ones, doesn't have to look fussy. This grouping still seems dynamic because the auxillary pieces are slightly different styles and shapes. Image from Elle Decor.

(Image credit: Nuevo Estilo)

I love the tension between the two pieces of art in this room from Nuevo Estilo. Instead of going for the obvious choice (the larger painting hanging over the sofa) the decorator has created a delicious balance between big and small, with the large canvas balanced out by the sofa and the smaller painting.

(Image credit: Adrienne Breaux)

Just turning a painting 45 degrees can help you see it in an entirely new light. From Laura & Ray's Art-Filled Austin Home.

(Image credit: Stephanie Strickland)

Spotted in Rena's Global Eclectic San Francisco Apartment, this is a more casual look and one that I really love: small pieces leaning up against a larger piece. It's easy to change up on a whim, too.

This is a great idea for a gallery wall: same-sized frames, different art. Photo by William Waldron for Architectural Digest.

(Image credit: Sheep and Stone)

When hanging your art, don't forget to consider other pieces, too. This asymmetrical arrangement, on its own, might seem a bit strange, but the lamp helps to balance everything out. Spotted in Sara's Scandinavian-Style Downtown Brooklyn Condo.

(Image credit: Alvhem Makleri)

I'm digging this frame-in-frame look from Alvhem Makleri. It celebrates the more permanent piece above while creating a changeable display below, too.

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