Curtains, Drapes and Blinds for a Glass Front Door

Curtains, Drapes and Blinds for a Glass Front Door

Catrin Morris
Apr 12, 2011

Glass entry doors can be beautiful introductions to a home. If you're lucky, the door, sidelights or transoms may boast decorative or stained glass. Glass doors also let in a ton of natural light — but they can also let in unwanted draughts, sounds and can greatly diminish the amount of privacy. There are shades, drapes and portieres that allow you to maintain the beauty of your glass front door! Check out some potential solutions…

Roman Shades We chose relaxed roman shades for our glass front door (Image #1) because we wanted a covering that could be easily raised and lowered. Apart from giving us light when we want it, roman shades also allow us to show off the beautiful decorative caming (metal strips that bind pieces of glass together) on the sidelights (which mirror the transoms above). We wanted a fabric sheer enough to let in light but opaque enough to provide privacy in our urban neighborhood in Washington, DC — just a block from a main thoroughfare. We settled on a very basic lightly textured slightly off white linen called Shawn in the color "oyster" at Calico Corners. It is no longer available but Slubby Linen is similar.

Kristen and Scott also live in a turn-of-the-century home in Woodley Park and were similarly interested in a covering that would give them privacy without blocking out too much natural light. They chose a woven roman shade from Next Day Blinds (Images 2 and 3).

Curtains Putting a thicker curtain (or portiere) in front of the door can provide extra privacy and limit cold drafts in the winter and dampen sounds between a residence and the outside world (whether that be the street or the apartment building hallway). But drapery can block out natural light when in use. When not in use, however. the curtain can be tied back for a dramatic, romantic look as seen in A Curtain at the Front Door.

Another way to hang drapery on a front door is to use a curtain rod with a hinge that allows the curtain to open and close with the door (image #5). If you are interested in learning how to make your own portiere check out Bohemian Hell Hole and this article at Chest of Books.

Images: 1: Catrin Morris; 2-5: as linked above

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