Switching From PC To A Mac: Common Myths Debunked

Switching From PC To A Mac: Common Myths Debunked

Joel Pirela
Feb 15, 2011

There are lots of myths in regards of switching to a Mac platform. Is it the software that we use at work? Or maybe the files we already have? These days, the switch is easier than ever; and we are going to point out some misconceptions and great features that the Mac world has to offer.

Macs are too expensive: When we compare similar equipped machines, the price difference is pretty minimal. Check out this example:

Apple MacBook ( 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB RAM, 250 GB storage, 13.3 Screen for $999) versus Sony VAIO VPC13V5E (2.53GHZ, 2GB RAM, 320GB storage, 13.3 Screen for $1100).
When you see prices for super cheap PC laptops, they're likely made with cheap components instead of quality materials; software wise, they come installed with just bare bones OS or bloatware that you don't need or will ever use. On top of that, you may have to spend hours troubleshooting driver conflicts or patching virus definitions and more. Another things to consider is that Macs hold their value better than PCs in general, so when you decide to upgrade, you may recoup some of that initial investment.

I need Excel/PowerPoint/Word: Microsoft makes Office for the Mac, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook. You will find total compatibility between the same document opened and saved from one PC to a Mac. Also Apple offers Office compatible software like Pages and Numbers, both which can open and save in Microsoft Office native file formats your Windows friends can use.

They can't run Windows apps: Now that all Macs use Intel chips inside, they have the ability to run Windows natively instead of just using slow emulation software. You can either use the provided free BootCamp or use any of the other programs available out there like Parallels or VMware Fusion, but remember, the whole joy of using Macs is that you don't have to run Windows but is good to know that you could if you have to.

I need to buy a new mouse/webcam/keyboard: The Mac is standards compliant which means that all recent peripherals are simply plug-and-play on your new Mac. OS X will even pick the driver needed for you automatically, simplifying the process. Even components that say they are not Mac compatible often are, so search using "product names+OS X" to see if other users have noted success with supposed Windows-only peripherals. It'susually just a case of a manufacturer not offering official support.

(Image: Flickr member Natasha C Dunlicensed for use under Creative Commons)

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