The Good & the Bad of Online Music Platforms

There are almost as many music platforms as there are social media networks now — and many that are combinations of both. We decided to take a step back and outline the good and the bad out of all the music platforms we've been juggling around.

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Raditaz: Always eager to try out the new guys, we checked out Raditaz as soon as we read about it. It's similar to Pandora where you create stations. You can also listen to top hits stations or find music by genre, decade or whatever is trending.

It doesn't have social media integration yet so you can't follow your friends or share music automatically through the platform which could be a plus or minus depending on whether social is important to you.

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Turntable FM: Although this has lost its "just-released" hype we still like to visit Turntable FM now and again because of the gaming aspect of it. It's fun to rack up points and play DJ with friends.

To get into the more popular rooms, you can wait hours before a spot opens to DJ. Sometimes people play bad music and you either have to sit through it or switch rooms unless you can get enough people to give it a thumbs down. It's an involved process so it's not the best platform for leaving on and just plugging away at work.

Pandora: Surprisingly we're not all about the platforms that let us create our own music lists entirely from scratch. Sometimes it's nice to have someone mix it up for you. As fun as it is to have our friends mix music for us on Turntable, sometimes Pandora knows what we like better than they do. It's also a great way for discovering new music.

The downside is you can't really save the music anywhere on Pandora to listen to it, you have to either buy it or wait until it's played again.

Dropbox: Yes we know what you're thinking. Why would you use Dropbox for music? Oddly enough, a group of friends and I share music through Dropbox. It's an easy way to be more exclusive, only those invited can see and access the files, and you can get all files at once and download them onto your own iTunes library.

However, it is a bit old school to be using a tool like Dropbox for music sharing when other platforms like Spotify have integrated so much social sharing onto their platform.

Spotify: Which brings us to Spotify. Although we love and still use all the platforms listed above, currently our favorite may have to be Spotify. It provides the best "across all channels" type experience with the iTunes library and Facebook integration.

The music selection isn't the largest on Spotify and there are certain songs that we were able to get on Grooveshark but not on Spotify. However we like the interface design better and overall it's a more user-friendly experience.

Image: Julienne Lin

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