The Hermit's Cabin: For Solitude and Silence

"Most people probably associate hermit living with mysticism and religion," says Mats Theselius, designer (along with Swedish design firm Arvesund) of the Hermit's Cabin, a small one-person-only, all-season house made of reclaimed barn timber. "But that is wrong. It’s rather about challenging the hectic city life and taking a natural step back." If you live in a big city, those words should resonate with you. I've been dreaming of having a little getaway like this ever since I read Michael Pollan's book A Place Of My Own.

In 1999 Swedish designer Mats began the collaboration with Arvesund to design the Hermit’s Cabin. It was first exhibited in Cologne in the spring of 2000, and has since been featured in a number of fairs and exhibitions around the world. The cabin is built mostly with old barn reclaimed timber on the inside and outside, and custom made based on what the buyer wants. It's suitable for winter use with organic insulation in the floors, walls, and roof, and galvanized metal sheets for the roof, window sills and gutters.

More specs:

  • Living space: 8 m2 Ca. measurements (w x l x h) 2,6 x 3 x 3 m
  • Weight: ca 1500 kg
  • Furnishing: beds, chairs, table, wardrobe and shelf.
  • Heating: wood-stove with water heater, floor plate and chimney.
  • Textiles: linen curtains, pillow cases of linen/wool, bedspread of wool, and a washable lambskin.

Mats continues: "I want to show the possibility to escape from the urban life for a while. The cabin challenges the discussions about the individual contra the society and human needs for solitude. For that reason we have filled the cabin with the few things you need. Here you can eat, sleep, read or just do nothing at all."

Beginning this fall, a larger version of the Hermit's Cabin called the Hermitage will become available. Download this PDF for more information.

More The Hermit's Cabin from Arvesund

(Images: Arvesund)