The Nafshun Bone's Beautiful Botanical Arts & Crafts Abode

Green Tour

Name: The Nafshun Bone Family
Location: Santa Monica, California
Size: 2,400 square feet
Years lived in: 10, owned

The American Arts and Crafts movement could be considered one of the first "green" initiatives of the 20th century. By incorporating simple designs and local resources, the movement turned away from Victorian era excess and Industrial Age mass production, and brought the focus back to the artisan. In their 100-year-old Craftsman bungalow, the Nafshun Bone family live a modern Southern Californian life that includes pool parties, games of "Rock Band," and a devotion to the Arts and Crafts style.

From a modest living room to a subterranean space used for band practice, every room in the family's historic bungalow is furnished with the characteristic simple, dark wood furniture of the Arts and Crafts movement. There's a chair by Gustav Stickley, a dresser by Charles Limbert, and a bed salvaged from The Grove Park Inn, a historic Arts and Crafts resort in Asheville, North Carolina.

And though Mike Bone is passionate about all things Arts and Crafts, it's his drought-resistant garden that really gets him going. A self-declared "succulent fanatic" the amateur horticulturist raises dozens of different species of aloe plants along the edge of a fence on the side of his house. The little seedlings eventually make their way to the front or side garden, where a drip-irrigation system keeps the low-maintenance plants happily and healthily watered. No doubt Mike's Arts and Crafts predecessors would have applauded his botanical prowess.

Re-Nest Survey:

My/Our style: Arts and Crafts or Mission style

Inspiration: Charles Limbert, Gustav Stickley, Greene and Greene, Alfred E. Newman, Charles Rennie Macintosh

Favorite Element: The ease of flow between rooms. The economy of effort required to maintain the space.

Biggest Challenge: Light

What Friends Say: "We love your house"

Biggest Embarrassment: Having to keep the recycling, yard waste and trash can in the drive way.

Proudest DIY: The drought tolerant front yard and the surfboard outdoor shower. I think using one of the surfboard fins as a towel hook was genius.

Biggest Indulgence: The outdoor furniture in the back yard. (expensive)

Best Advice: Water is a home's worst enemy.

Green Elements/Initiatives: Drought tolerant front yard. Succulents on the side of the house. All on drip irrigation system. Salt water swimming pool powered by solar panels. Cork flooring in the kitchen. Preserving a 100-year-old home.

Resources:

Hardware: Most of it is original. Liz's Antique Hardware on La Brea and Crown City Hardware in Pasadena for other stuff.

Furniture: We have a lot of Charles Limbert pieces. The two rockers in the living room are Limbert. Ari's dresser is Limbert. The secretary is Limbert.  Mica's bed is from the Grove Park Inn in Ashville, North Carolina. I made her bookcase (no nails or screws in it, pegged together.) The chair in the living room is Stickley, but only Gracie the Airedale sits in it. The piece in the kitchen is actually two pieces. On the bottom is a spool display case from the American Thread Company. On top is a silver chest that I found at an antique shop in Macon, Georgia (my home town). It has a tag on top of it stating that it was presented to the Philip Myers couple on the occasion of their wedding June 2, 1918 from the Schwob Brothers.

Lighting: Several Van Briggle lamps around. Some Tiffany knock offs. Not enough lamps for a brightly lit house. Lighting is an issue in these houses.

Tiles and Stone: Granite around the pool, and some collector tiles that we use as coasters in the living room.

Window Treatments: Ann Wallace in two bed rooms.

Beds: Mica's is from the Grove Park Inn.

Accessories: The bird houses were made by a friend of a friend in Arizona. He picks up trash in the desert and then converts it to art.

Artwork: From friends that are painters and collectors.

Paint: Benjamin Moore

Flooring: Original oak.

(Thanks, Mike, Lori, Mica, and Ari!)

Interested in sharing your home with Re-Nest? Contact our editors through our Green Tour Submission Form.

(Images: Celeste Sunderland)

6 Comments