The Return of the DVR

Well, to be honest, it's not like it went anywhere to begin with. It's just network programming companies are finally starting to get the idea that people actually enjoy TV more when it's working around their time and not theirs. Heck, many even watch the ads now without the inclination to fast forward through them...

Should this come as much of a surprise? We don't think so. There are people in our household that honestly believe TiVO is a better overall invention than television itself (though we think that's a bit of a stretch).

For those who watch little TV, the few shows they like to watch are on whenever they have the time or inclination to watch. Then, there are those who watch a lot of TV, they can record one show while watching another, and then have a backlog to catch up on Saturday or Sunday mornings.

While we personally don't consider ourselves TV junkies by any means, but we do enjoy our Monday nights filled with network television as much as the next Heroes fan... when we have the time. Which is one of the reasons we believe Hulu has done so well; people enjoy having the convenience DVR has brought - bringing quality shows that work on our time.

Also, recent statistics show that users on DVR sets are actually watching commercials even though they are recorded. In contrast, it was only 2 years ago that network executives fiercely resisted the embrace of DVRs, fearing viewers would simply skip through all the commercials of recorded shows.

Our favorite reaction comes from NBC's president of research, Alan Wurtzel, "It's complete counterintuitive," "But when the facts come in, there they are." All we have to say about that is, "Well, of course they are. We're not all lazy, media-leeching thieves, you know."

Another lesson learned that technology isn't always evil when used properly with the users in mind.

You can read more about the DVR popularity surge over at the New York Times.

[Via Engadget]

[Image: Unplggd]