This Brutalist Espresso Maker Is Made From Concrete

This Brutalist Espresso Maker Is Made From Concrete

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Melissa Massello
Aug 26, 2017
(Image credit: AnZa Coffee)

There's porous, organic countertop accessories and then there's pour us another cup from this new concrete espresso machine, soon to be gracing the kitchens of modern, Brutalism-loving java junkies everywhere.

According to Food & Wine, the concrete AnZa espresso machine is the brainchild of Oslo, Norway- and Berkeley, California-based design firm Montaag — the geniuses who are also behind the gluten-detecting, Celiac-saving food sensor Nima.

Made of concrete, glass, brass, Corian, and porcelain and using the inner workings of an existing luxury-end $1299 Italian machine as a guide, Montaag designer Andrew Smith said in a statement that the AnZa started as a simple exercise to "explore what an espresso machine could feel like through the use of completely honest materials," but overwhelmingly positive feedback led them to create the Kickstarter campaign and scale production, with an expected release and fulfillment date of March 2018.

(Image credit: AnZa Coffee)

The design firm shares its Berkeley office space with Kanen Coffee, a full-service espresso repair shop that lent their technical expertise and guidance for the AnZa coffee machine collaboration, and creative inspiration was taken from surrounding Bay Area salvage yards and industrial workshops to design "a conversation piece that aims to refashion the industry of home espresso machines."

At the time of publication, the Kickstarter for the AnZa espresso machine had already raised more than $130,000 in the first week of its campaign, which runs for ten more days. The discounted AnZa machines start at $799 and are available through the Montaag Kickstarter page.

(Image credit: AnZa Coffee)

As a Boston native who grew up with mixed feelings about our Brutalist City Hall and similarly has mixed feelings about her unpolished, inherited concrete kitchen countertops in her home, I don't see one of these machines gracing my coffee station any time soon — although it would blend in much better (and more stylishly) than our wedding-registry-standard black and stainless Cuisinart Brew Central, so maybe I ought to rethink it.

For those questionable over the concrete, there is a Corian and brass option, which is so bright and perky it almost renders caffeine unnecessary. Almost.

What do you think of the AnZa espresso machine — or Brutalism as a design aesthetic in general? Tell us in the comments.

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