Prepared to Be Wowed: This Rooftop Addition to a Historic NoMad Building is the Ultimate Manhattan Dream Home

Prepared to Be Wowed: This Rooftop Addition to a Historic NoMad Building is the Ultimate Manhattan Dream Home

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Nancy Mitchell
Mar 26, 2017
(Image credit: Dwell)

Living in New York is fast-paced, and exhilarating, and a dream for many, but for most people, it also means making a few sacrifices — like living in a teeny-tiny apartment with no outdoor space and a view of a brick wall. But just north of Madison Square Park, atop a historic building that dates all the way back to 1869, one family has it all — in a two-story penthouse with ample outdoor space and sweeping views of the city. Here's a look inside their dreamy, light-filled rooftop home.

(Image credit: Dwell)

The building is the Gilsey House, which was originally a luxury hotel, before it became a garment factory and then a set of artists' lofts. The architect (and resident) of the space is Jay Valgora (of STUDIO V), who purchased the top-floor loft 25 years ago. Searching for a way to maximize the space and carve out more room for his growing family, he seized upon a solution that many New Yorkers before him have embraced: building up.

(Image credit: Dwell)

After an arduous permitting process, Jay finally got the approval to expand his home skyward, breaking through the building's roof and adding a glass-and-zinc structure on the roof, which gives his home a second story and also a third-level rooftop terrace, which forms a sort of outdoor living room.

(Image credit: Dwell)
(Image credit: Dwell)

On the lower level (the home's original floor), the ceiling in the living room now soars to an impressive 24 feet. The voluminous room takes advantage of that vertical space with a full-height wall of bookshelves, provided with a ladder of course, that's like something from Beauty and the Beast. A staircase leads to the upper levels, and tall windows frame views of the Empire State Building.

(Image credit: Dwell)

Upstairs are bedrooms for Jay and his wife, and for their two young sons. The master bedroom has a sliding wall which opens it up to a garden terrace, on the building's original roof. There's also a wet room, or a shower with a tub inside, where one can soak with a view of the city.

Want to see more? Check out the full tour on Dwell, and prepare to be very, very jealous.

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