Tip: Five More Uses for Salt

Tip: Five More Uses for Salt

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Regina Yunghans
Feb 22, 2010

We all use salt in our food, but did you know it has lots of other uses, too? I was baking some muffins over the weekend and noticed a "Household Hint" on the Morton salt container:

"Place silk flowers into a large bag and pour in one cup of Morton Salt. Shake vigorously." Hmm, so that's how to clean silk flowers! I don't use them in my home, but I've often wondered about them becoming dusty. And by then the bait had worked: I got the muffins into the oven, set the timer, and hopped onto mortonsalt.com. There, I found four more "Household Hints" that seem particularly helpful:

  • "Remove rust from household tools by using Morton ® Salt and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Apply the paste to rusted area with a dry cloth and rub."
  • Remove odors from a wood cutting board by "pour[ing] a generous amount of Morton ® Salt directly on the board. Rub lightly with a damp cloth. Wash in warm, sudsy water."
  • To clean a glass vase "mix 1/3 cup Morton ® Salt and 2 tablespoons vinegar to form a paste. Apply to inside of vase. Let stand 20 minutes, scrub, and discard paste. Rinse vase and dry. For a large vase, double or triple the quantity of paste."
  • "To patch small nail holes and fine cracks in plaster or wallboard, mix 2 tablespoons Morton ® Salt, 2 tablespoons cornstarch and about 4 to 5 teaspoons water to make a thick, pliable paste. Fill hole and let dry. Sand if necessary, then paint."

Obviously, this can be done with any brand of household table salt, not just Morton. But thank you, Morton Salt, for the helpful hints! There are a few more, including children's projects and wellness tips at mortonsalt.com.

Images: Really Natural, An Eco-Friendly Way to Clean Rust Off Metal, Product Review: Boos Block Cutting Board, How To: Arrange Fresh Summer Flowers in a Low Vase, Grouping a Large Collection of Pictures

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