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This is Christien Meindertsma knitting (not Sara Kate).

Over our holiday, knitting came out in a force not seen before in our home. I don't know whether it was the sense of recession, delighting in the rich fibres or just wanting to get busy, but Sara Kate and her mother knitted something for almost everyone on both sides of our family and the needles never stopped clicking. Knitting is obviously very popular already, but I was surprised to learn that it's now morphing into Extreme Knitting and is already moving into the realm of interiors and furniture. I did a little research and found some really cool stuff to share...

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• Christien Meindertsma is out in front of the extreme knitting trend having already produced these poufs and rugs for DWR. She's from Holland. Here's her website
>> www.theseflocks.com

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• Xtreme Knitting in NYC! This is a great radio segment which introduces you to the world of extreme knitting, guerrilla knitters, knit tagging and "people who knit with weird stuff like fiberglass and lead, people who get together for massive knitting parties and cover entire park benches with yarn. Wow."
>> Xtreme Knitters Rock the Yarn

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(Image credit: Apartment Therapy )

• Rachel John in England seems to be ground zero for extreme knitting and extreme knitting supplies, which include huge needles and huge diameter felted yarn. She knits rugs out of anywhere from 3-200 mixed yarn strands simultaneously.
>> racheljohn.co.uk

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Knitter Ingrid Wagner breaking the world record for big knitting (via Treehugger)
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• Selvedge is a beautiful magazine out of England that focuses on textiles and home crafts.
>> Selvedge.org

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• Knit Knit is a magazine out of NYC for obsessive knitters.
>> knitknit.net

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Yesterday's Email Post:

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>> Inspiration: Design Thrives in Hard Times