What If Naoto Fukasawa Designed a Digital Camera?

Favorite design blogger, Andrew Kim of Minimally Minimal, is back again with another "what if" design. This time Andrew imagines a mirrorless camera through the design philosophies of Naoto Fukasawa, resulting a camera design where simplicity takes front stage in form and function...

Si features a simple dial responsible for adjusting the exposure of the camera. It is a natural interaction that is immediately understood by any user. Capturing the photo is done by pressing down on the same dial. The touch display of the camera displays the current exposure level.

Andrew's Pentax concept camera has the appearance of a large OS X desktop icon come to dimensional life, with a rectilinear shape and the lens dominating the front face; controls are filtered down to the bare basics of "capture" and "expose". Considering the majority of camera owners primarily shoot in automatic mode, and with camera computer image quality calculations improving each iteration, there's a strong argument for a "less is more" approach to consumer targeted digital camera.

The closest real-world counterpart is probably the Nikon 1 J1 model, a mirrorless model with similar minimalistic form factor and marketed to a mainstream user.

Samsung's Samsung NX100 is a little busier, but shares a similar design philosophy.

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UPDATE: well look it here...Fuji's upcoming XP1 Leica-ish mirrorless camera has been leaked today and it shares many of the attributes to the concept above.

In the age of iPhone-tography and Instagram "film", ease of use is quickly becoming this generation's instant film Polaroid, thus it's no surprise digital cameras themselves are jettisoning extraneous features most users never touch (or know how to use). Whether camera makers go as minimalist extreme as Andrew Kim's concept is up in the air...but count me in if they do!

(Photos: Andrew Kim)

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