When it Comes to Mobile Etiquette, Americans Think One Thing & Do the Opposite

When it Comes to Mobile Etiquette, Americans Think One Thing & Do the Opposite

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Tara Bellucci
Aug 31, 2015
(Image credit: Vlad Teodor/Shutterstock)

90% of Americans frequently carry cell phones with them, and this has led to some fluid changes in how we view social etiquette surrounding them.

In our always-on culture, there are some shifting social norms where our phones are involved. The Pew Research Center conducted a study on mobile etiquette, and while Americans agree overall that phones used in social settings are distracting and annoying, most still do it anyway.

Delving deeper into when and where phone use is acceptable:

77% of all adults think it is generally OK for people to use their cellphones while walking down the street and 75% believe it is OK for others to use phones on public transit. But only 38% think it is generally OK for others to use cellphones at restaurants and just 5% think it is generally OK to use a cellphone at a meeting.

But if you've never once used your phone at a meeting or at dinner, you'd be in the minority— 89% of respondents said they used their phone during their last social interaction.

Check out more of the research:

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