When it Gets Stormy: Weather Radio Roundup

As the skies darken during spring and the weather turns nasty, it is always a good idea to be prepared . One piece of emergency tech we highly recommend equipping yourself with is a weather radio. Yes, those things your grandmother probably chastised you about not having. Here is a roundup of our favorite weather radios...

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  1. Midland WR-300: The WR-300 is one of the gold standards of weather radios. It features a multi-line display that alerts you to warninga and watches within the county you live and other relevant information. Having used one multiple times over the past few years, we can attest to the robustness and usefulness of having a full featured weather radio.
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  2. Eton Red Cross Weather Radio: The Eton radio is a classic survival radio perfect for hurricanes and other prolonged sever weather. The radio can charge cellphones and does not require batteries making it a perfect item to store away and forget about until the worst happens. Just don't forget to add the relevant charger cable for your particular cellphone other wise its charging ability cannot be utilized.
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  3. Midland WR-11 Clock Radio: One of the downsides to a dedicated weather radio like the WR-300 is that it is another device and an ugly one at that next to your bedside. The WR-11 fits a solid weather radio into a traditional clock radio reducing device clutter and giving you the piece of mind that weather alerts will rouse you in the middle of the night.
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  4. Midland XT-511: The XT-511 is the king of emergency crank radios featuring not only a weather radio, but also a FRS emergency broadcast radio. That way if you are suffer through some very severe catastrophe, you can still hopefully communicate with emergency responders. The radio still functions as a weather radio, cellphone charger, and can use a variety of power sources including the built in crank. We think of this radio as the ultimate in foul weather and disaster survival.

(Top image: Flickr member NOAA Photo Library licensed under Creative Commons)