Why the PS3 Does Not Do Everything (and How Sort of Fix That)

Why the PS3 Does Not Do Everything (and How Sort of Fix That)

Anthony Nguyen
Jan 19, 2010

You've seen the commercials. You've read our library of hacks and tweaks. However, after 2 1/2 years of dedicating our lives towards trying to make the Sony console a multimedia bliss-box, we've decided there is one major flaw that keeps it from being the greatest set-top box that ever lived...

Contrary to what you might have heard, the PS3 does not do HD streaming very well over wireless. The reason? It's the god-forsaken wireless-G card Sony has decided is "enough" for a next generation gaming console that's suppose to last for 10 years.

The problem is that wireless-G technologies weren't made to handle today's highly demanding HD streams. DVD quality streams, no problem, but HD? The average compressed 1080p HD stream runs an average of 25Mbps. 720p HD streams are usually around 8-10Mbps. If you've ever tried Tversity, PS3 Media Server, or PlayOn, you'll quickly realize that 4Mpbs is pretty much the cap for wireless HD streaming without having it choke and do all sorts of weird things. 4Mpbs?! That's half of 720p. That's not next-gen, if you ask us.

The Vox PS3 Group took a shot at it and found that there is a very, very convoluted way of upgrading the PS3 to wireless-N since 1) it does not support wireless-N natively and 2) the PS3 does not support usb-wireless sticks.

Pretty much the only workaround is to follow this tutorial which basically asks that you set up a 2nd access point as a repeater, wire the PS3 up through ethernet, and manually set up the IP. It's a pain in the ass, but supposedly, it works.

One change we would recommend, however, is to experiment around a bit with some gigabit routers instead of the one Asmodeus (the Vox PS3 group blogger) used in his tests. Gigabit allows for much more data to pass through and may raise the bottleneck on the PS3 even further.

While a workaround is nice, we still do find it fairly stupid on Sony's part to not include a wireless-N upgrade feature, forcing users to go out of their way and come up with elaborate solutions like these in order to get something as simple as HD streaming to work properly. Shame on you, Sony!

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