You Can Visit Laura Palmer's House From Twin Peaks — If You Can Be Cool

You Can Visit Laura Palmer's House From Twin Peaks — If You Can Be Cool

A starring turn on television, much like it does for actors, can also make a house famous — or infamous as the case may be. That was what happened to this picturesque Everett, Washington colonial home. The house took center stage on TV's cult hit Twin Peaks, during its original two-season run from 1990-1991, as the home of the fictional murdered teen Laura Palmer. Over two decades later, the home returned to stardom again this year on Showtime's reboot of the beloved series, "Twin Peaks: The Return."

In fact, resurgent interest in Laura Palmer's house since the reboot premiered has led the home's real-life owners to open their doors to curious fans. No, the home hasn't been turned into a Twin Peaks museum or anything like that. The house, located about 40 minutes outside Seattle, is still privately owned and lived in.

So how exactly then can you get a peek inside the spook-tastic home this Halloween? Turns out, you just have to ask nicely. The home's real-life owner, Mary Reber, explains in an interview with Vulture, "we love people and love bringing people through the home that haven't been able to see it. And it's a real joy to us." Some fans have even called ahead to schedule viewing appointments.

Reber purchased the home three years ago (she also had a cameo in the final episode of Twin Peaks: The Return). "We're hoping everybody keeps it low-key," says Reber. For fans, the accessibility of Laura Palmer's house is a newfound treat; the home's previous owners weren't as accommodating to curious looky-loos. "So we're getting people who watched the show when it originally aired and had been waiting to see the house," says Reber.

Curious about other real-life homes and locales made famous on the small and big screens? Check out these 17 Real-Life Places Straight Out of Nostalgic Movies & TV.

h/t Curbed Seattle

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