AOC Architecture: Exploring Green Housing

(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

Shortlisted for AutoDesk’s Young Architect of the Year Award, British architecture firm AOC is gaining international exposure. Their projects sometimes have a messy look that differs from the clean lines of contemporary architecture, but beneath this rough exterior lies an in-depth exploration of why we live the way we do and how we can improve our lives by redesigning our immediate environment. One of our favorite AOC projects involves a list of 10 things that every home needs…

(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)
(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

Guided by 10 things no home should go without, each of AOC’s housing designs incorporate: “its own front door and entryway, some potential for change, as much storage as possible, the potential of a naked view, the opportunity to enclose your kitchen, room for outdoor dining, room to do home-work, somewhere to grow things, somewhere to sit out and relax in peace, and somewhere to air-dry your clothes.” Sounds good (and green) to us.

(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

In addition to designing housing, AOC also works on civic and educational projects. No. 1 Lower Carbon Drive is a large-scale model constructed for the London Green Homes project. The installation instructs people on ways to incorporate green systems into their homes.

(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

Another intriguing project on the AOC site is the Janet Summers Early Years Centre. Constructed from varying levels and materials, this early education center is full of child-sized nooks and crannies.

(placeholder)
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

For more information on AOC’s built and unbuilt projects, click here.

Photos: Folly for a Filmmaker: Photographed by Mike Betts, Janet Summers Early Years Centre: Photographed by Dominik Gigler. Found via Bustler.

Loading...
Loading...