Here’s How Famous Paintings Would Look IRL

published Apr 10, 2019
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(Image credit: Courtesy of HomeAdvisor)

During the quest for home decor ideas that resonate with your personal aesthetic, sometimes the design muse you seek is hidden in plain sight. Have you considered how much design inspo exists in famous paintings? Well, the folks over at HomeAdvisor have, and fortunately they’ve already done quite a bit of creative legwork to give us an idea of how six renowned artworks would translate to real-life household settings.

First up on the list is Vincent Van Gogh’s “The Bedroom.” In 1888, the artist illustrated a recreation of his room, a sparsely furnished space with bright colors and paintings. The real-life rendition is spot on and maintains the painting’s original color scheme and calm, simplistic feel.

(Image credit: Courtesy of HomeAdvisor)

The realistic treatment designers gave to Grant Wood’s “The Sun Shine on the Corner” (1928) offers a fresher, more inviting take on the painting, while retaining the illustrated conservatory’s “sense of quiet” and muted tones.

Without a doubt, decorating your living room is the one place where it’s absolutely crucial for your personal space to reflect your tastes. It’s where most people spend a ton of time hanging out, and it’s typically the most visible area in the home, which is why you want to avoid making living room layout mistakes.

(Image credit: Courtesy of HomeAdvisor)

This updated spin on Roy Lichenstein’s 1991 oil and acrylic piece masterfully recreates the original by incorporating similar geometric decorative details and pairing gray furniture and an area rug with colorful artwork, including a pair of vintage paintings by the artist.

(Image credit: Courtesy of HomeAdvisor)

Among the other famous paintings HomeAdvisor designers breathed life into are Wassily Kandisky’s 1909 work “Interior (My Dining Room);” Eduard Petrovich Hau’s “Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s Sitting Room, Cottage Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia;” and Konstantin Korovin’s “Interior.”