How To Wrap an Extension Cord Like a Boss

How To Wrap an Extension Cord Like a Boss

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Ashley Poskin
Sep 9, 2015
(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

There are things contractors do that we all should take note of, and electrical cord storage is one of those things. It's important to properly store your cord to elongate its lifespan- plus, it will save you the headache of having to unwind 100 feet of tangles and knots.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

The Over Under method is quite possibly the most popular way to store cords. While it may not be as visually pleasing as the contractor's wrap, it coils a cord in a manner that allows it to quickly unravel if you're looking for the fastest way to run it from one side of a room to the other. Read on for the full tutorial.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

The Contractor's Wrap not only keeps your cords from becoming tangled, it makes them look exceptionally neat and tidy while hanging in storage. If you know how to crochet, this technique should come easily for you. And you start by doubling up the cord, so you're essentially cutting the wrap time in half- it looks fancy and it's a time saver! Read on for the full tutorial.

The Over-Under

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Start at one end of the cord and pull it taut so your hands are approximately 3' apart. Your left palm should be facing up and your right palm down so that your thumbs are pointing in the same direction.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Bring the cord in your right hand over to your left hand.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

The cord should naturally loop so it looks like the photo above. If it twists, just twirl the cord around until the twist falls out.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Pick the tail back up with your right hand and hold it palm facing up, so now your thumbs are pointing in opposite directions.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Turn your right hand over, so your palm is now facing down, creating a figure 8 like in the photo above.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Transfer the cord from your right to your left hand.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Pull the tail back out with your right hand, palm down, and transfer the cord over, into your left hand.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Repeat these steps, winding over for one loop, and under for the next until the cord is completely wound.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

It might not look like much, but this method will allow the cord to uncoil much easier (and without tangles!) than if you had quickly wrapped it around your elbow.

The Contractor's Wrap

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Start by removing any tangles in the cord and plugging the male end into the female end.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

After you've connected the two ends, work your way down to find the middle of the cord.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Hold the middle of the cord 6"-8" from the base of the loop, with your palm facing out, so the loop end is pointing up.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Rotate your hand so that your palm is facing you. The loop end of the cord should now be pointing down.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Keeping a firm grasp on the loop with one hand, use the other to push the tail cords through the loop to the front from the backside (or reach around from the front and pull the tail cords through).

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

You should now have the first loop in your chain. Adjust the size of the loop to your liking by sliding the end of the loop up or down.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Hold one end of the new loop, and reach through to the front to pick up the tail cords.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Pull the tail upwards so that it sits about 6"-8" above the first loop to create the second loop.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Adjust the cords as you wind so that they stay at even lengths.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)
(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)
(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

After pulling one loop through the next, reach down, grab the tail, and pull another loop up through the last until you've looped the entire length of cord into a chain.

(Image credit: Ashley Poskin)

Once you've finished, store the cord by hanging it on a wall, or fold it up and place on a shelf.

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