The Outdated Kitchen Trend We Think Can Make a Comeback

The Outdated Kitchen Trend We Think Can Make a Comeback

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Nancy Mitchell
Oct 1, 2017
(Image credit: Houzz)

The history of design is littered with defunct trends — things that were popular for a brief span of time and are now reviled, or just forgotten. Some of them probably don't deserve a revival (I'm looking at you, shag carpeting), but others are worth a second look. One thing that falls squarely into the second camp? The mirrored backsplash.

If I'm not mistaken, the first time this trend came around was in the late '70s and early '80s. I remember a few mirrored backsplashes from my childhood, although by then they were talked about as something distinctly undesirable, mostly the province of old wet bars that nobody had bothered to tear out. I always assumed that mirrored backsplashes were pretty much done, until I lived in an apartment, right after college, that had a tiny kitchen with a mirrored backsplash — and I loved it. The backsplash made the kitchen seem so much bigger, and it was just so fancy, in a late-70s glam kind of way. I've been a fan ever since.

(Image credit: Shelley Johnstone)

This kitchen design, from Shelley Johnstone, is not late '70s at all: in fact, it's quite traditional. (I think this might actually be a wet bar and not a kitchen, but this would work just as well as a kitchen.) A mirrored backsplash is, in my opinion, a very nice look for a traditionally styled kitchen: it softens the austerity of the space a little, and adds a touch of glamour.

(Image credit: Blakes London)
(Image credit: Blakes London)

Here's another traditional kitchen with a mirrored backsplash, from Blakes London. Here, the mirrored backsplash is a bit more subtle, and only covers one wall. Making the backsplash from individual antiqued tiles lends a more traditional look.