Style Forecast: Tile Trends for 2014 and Beyond

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The tile trends for 2014 are looking to the future while simultaneously taking inspiration from the past. The future includes texture and matte finishes created with new manufacturing techniques never seen before. For the past, there are tile recreations of intricate patterns found in ancient archaeological digs, as well as graphic mid-century styles that could be from the imaginations of Charles and Ray Eames.

Mosaic Patterns: Mosaic patterned tiles date back to ancient Mesopotamia. The durability of delicate patterns show in the ancient tiles often uncovered during the renovations of period homes. Find inspiration everywhere from the souks of Marrakech to the Victorian homes of London.

Textured Tiles: Gone are the days of bland tile, but if bold pattern and color aren't for you, choose a neutral hue or stone with a texture. Even the flat 2D subway tile is starting to take a backseat to beveled subway tile in 2014. Textured tiles are particularly striking when paired with a matte finish.

  • Delta Hex from Filmore Clarke created by The Portland Cement Company.
  • Ann Sacks has an amazing range of textured tiles in both matte and glazed finishes.
  • Heath Ceramics creates true mid-century geometric textured tiles.
  • Known for her feminine use of pattern, Patricia Urquiola created a range of tiles for Mutina that have a lace inspired texture.
  • Jonathan Adler designed his own textured tiles for his Shelter Island home.

Geometric Tiles: Chevron, honeycomb, hexagon, and stripes are just a few of the classic shapes showing up on walls and floors in today's homes. This style can also accommodate more budgets by creating bold patterns through mixing and matching simple inexpensive tiles that alone would be a bore.

What tile trends are you most excited about?

(Image credits: Fired Earth; Fastighetsbryan; Fired Earth; House Beautiful; Walker Zanger; Filmore Clarke; Studio Home Designs; Heath Ceramics; Mutina; Architectural Digest; Domino; Claire Bock; House and Home)