Three's Company: Tips for Creating Rooms for 3 Or More Kids

Putting three or more children in one room may not sound ideal. Space configurations, not to mention decor choices for two genders and a variety of ages can't be easy. Take a look at different approaches to this problem featured on Apartment Therapy in the past: Though it might not always be one's first choice, children who grow up together in this kind of intimate setting may create bonds they might not otherwise if each had their own room. There will be lots of late night giggling and raucous pillow fights. Such is the stuff childhood is made of.

Top Row:

1. Takeaway tip from Loft for Triplets, Home By Novogratz: Sometimes the best solution for small spaces is to spend your money on customizing it. Here, the loft bed and desk were built by a carpenter to maximize space for these triplets.

2. Takeaway Tip from A Small Space Triple Bunk Solution: Again, customization was key here. These staggered bunks were made just for this space and work like a charm.

3. Takeaway Tip from Simon, Levi and Josie's Shared Room: Although the configuration will have to change when Josie gets bigger, this family utilized the closet as a niche for the baby's crib by taking off the door

4. Takeaway Tip from Minimalist Bunk Beds for Four: If you're really short on space, go as minimal as possible with both furniture and decor. Many children's bedrooms are traditionally also a play area, but you may have to limit them to just sleeping.

5. Takeaway Tip from Linus, Miles, and Oliver's "Make Room for Three!" Room: Fitting three cribs in one room is a challenge. Here, they were placed length-wise next to the wall to leave more room in the center of the room. This same strategy could be used for toddler or twin-sized beds.

Middle Row:

6. Takeaway Tip from My Room: Sophia, Ava and Olivia: This mom not only tied the room together with bedding - she saved money by buying one quilt and cutting it into pieces for the bedding.

7. Takeaway Tip from Three Little Boys, One Room: Here, each brother has a magnetic board near his bed to decorate and use as he wishes. A small gesture toward giving them each a tiny part of the room for himself.

8. Takeaway Tip from A Definitely, Indisputably, Not-Girly Shared Room: Use your vertical space. Here, two boys bunked up to save space and shelves and artwork were hung high to maximize the space.

9. Takeaway Tip from A Bedroom Built for Four: "Start organized and stay organized." That's a direct quote from the mom of the four kids who occupy this room. Her best strategies are to limit kids' belongings and to invest in smart storage - even if it's bigger than you'd like. She even brought in a large dresser to replace smaller bins because using up the space was less important than keeping the room uncluttered.

10. Takeaway Tip from A Trio of Hanging Beds: There are three main tips here: go vertical, build a custom solution and keep the belongings and decor to a minimum.

Bottom Row:

11. Takeaway Tip from A Charming Bedroom for Four: Uniformity creates a cohesive look. With a few subtle differences, each child's belongings (bed, bedding, chair, hamper, etc.) are the same.

12. Takeaway Tip from Bunk Beds for Four: Another Take: This isn't a particularly small room, but it still needs to house four kids. They smartly made the bunks into a wall of built-ins and included underbed storage. The nautical nets both play into a subtle theme for the room and add a safety component for the high bunks.

13. Takeaway Tip from Meg's Room For Three: A showpiece. Not only did Meg make some practical decisions about storage and organization in this space, the memorable cloud bed and rotating gallery wall immediately draw your eye in and distract from the smallness of the room.

(Image credited in original posts)

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