What Is the Best Way to Remove Dried Paint Splatters?

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We asked ourselves this very question when we spied the dreaded droplets (sounds sinister, eh?) on our beautiful vintage hardwood floors in our soon-to-be house. Someone had clearly been a sloppy painter in the past. With an 80 year old house, who knows how old those paint splatters might be or how they might be removed without destroying the floors?

Our first line of thought was to ask a pro, so we consulted the authorities at our local paint store…

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They suggested Goo Gone or any other citrus based cleaner. We tried this and it worked, but required several applications, soaking, and a bit of scraping.

Our next step was to consult the "oracle" (AKA, the internet) which provided a few other options. Denatured alcohol is supposed to work if you let the alcohol soak the stain and then use a brush to scrub. Basic all purpose cleaners like Mr. Clean and Simple Green can be used by wetting the dried paint with warm water, applying the liquid soap, and then scraping with a blunt edge (like an old credit card). Another cleaner made by Goo Gone called Painters Pal sounded like a friend indeed, but might be harder to find at your local stores. Steel wool is also said to remove an offending paint plop in a snap.

Before we try any of these other solutions, we would very much like to hear from our readers. What really works? Do other non-toxic home remedy cleaners like vinegar or baking soda do the job? Do you have any other easy, successful solutions for removing dried paint splatters without refinishing the floors?

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How to Remove Paint with Baking Soda and Water
A Non-Toxic Way to Remove Paint From Glass
Peel Away Paint Remover