Before and After: An Architect Gets Her Dream Kitchen

Before and After: An Architect Gets Her Dream Kitchen

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Tess Wilson
Jun 7, 2018
(Image credit: Sweeten)

Where exactly is the kitchen, you ask? Why, it's behind that grey dividing wall. And while the room's cabinetry and other surfaces were very nice, this home's new owner found the kitchen to be "small and closed-off." It was perhaps the most closed-off kitchen in the history of our renovation posts.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

Now the kitchen flows into the rest of the home, and while that means any mess generated during cooking is no longer hidden, the room is much more accessible and family-friendly. That last aspect was crucial to architect Tina Ladd on Sweeten, who was designing this home for herself, her husband, and her very-soon-to-be-born child. I love how the blue cabinetry almost acts as an accent wall, both drawing the eye and setting the kitchen apart from the rest of the space.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

The lighting here is dim, but it looks like the pre-renovation was quite nice. The cabinets are ample and attractive, the backsplash tile looks lovely, and that stove is majorly envy-inducing.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

The stove was kept—a wise move, considering Wolf ranges are about $7,000—but moved, as was the Sub-Zero fridge. They are both in very user-friendly spots and can't really be seen from the rest of the open-plan space, which is a clever arrangement; the wall of cabinetry is much more cohesive with the rest of the home than a wall of stainless appliances would have been. And while this renovation added a ton of counterspace thanks to its new L-shape, the island further increases the workspace and adds seating as well. (As a serious baker, I will say that as luxurious as it is to have lots of counterspace around the perimeter of a kitchen, there's nothing like a big chunk of workspace for tackling ambitious projects.) Another island bonus:

The kitchen design didn't really allow for an alternate microwave location, so we concealed it behind pocket doors in the island.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

The white backsplash has all the classic, minimal appeal of subway tiles, though their narrow proportions set them aside from the more ubiquitous dimensions. These work particularly well with the skinny floorboards, which have a beautiful grey cast. I also appreciate how well the handles coordinate with the stainless steel appliances. And perhaps it's just me, but this new kitchen seems at least twice as large as the old one—a major interior design accomplishment.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

And if you're wondering whether or not this fancy renovation includes a dishwasher, it does indeed. It's built into the cabinetry, which will never not impress me. I also appreciate that this photo includes the fuse box—a necessary part of every home but one that's rarely seen. The white paint allows it to blend into the wall, giving the impression of a charmingly old-timey built-in.

Thank you, Tina Ladd and Sweeten!

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