How to Create a Kokedama to Hang in Your Bathroom

published Jun 20, 2019
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Hanging plants above a bathtub
(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin)

With the rising population of plant parents, it’s no surprise we’re finding Kokedama decorating on porches, chilling on coffee tables, and hanging in showers. Kokedama, roughly translated as “moss ball,” is a minimal form of Japanese gardening that perfectly balances the odd and the beautiful, elevating hanging plants into an art form.

That art form happens to be perfect for your bathroom—in the shower, to be specific. Moss thrives in areas with lots of moisture, humidity, and dim, indirect light, so placing Kokedama in the shower makes them easier to care for. There’s another good reason to put your Kokedama in the shower: easy access to water. When you water these moss balls, you’ll soak the ball for 20 to 30 minutes, give it a gentle squeeze, then hang it back up. With the shower head at hand, this job is easy-peasy.

Here’s how to make one that’ll look great in your very own bathroom.

How to make a Kokedama

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Supplies:

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 1: Mix your peat moss and bonsai soil, and add in just enough water to the soil mixture to create a ball that packs but won’t crumble. The ball should stay packed when you hold it in your hand or set it down. If the ball crumbles, add more water.

Put in too much water? Don’t fret—just squeeze the ball to wring it out.

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 2: Remove the plant from its pot and shake off excess soil to reveal the roots. Depending on how moist the soil is, you may need to work it around and break it up with your fingers.

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 3: Break the ball in half, place the plant inside, and sculpt the ball around the roots. If the ball is too dry and crumbling, add more water. If it’s too damp, squeeze out excess water.

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 4: Lay the sheet moss face down on your work surface. If it’s dried out a bit, spray it with water until it’s damp and pliable. Set the ball in the middle of the sheet moss and begin to work the moss up around the sides towards the top of the ball. You may need to tear a few pieces of moss off, or add in a few small pieces here and there. Squeeze the moss around the ball to help it take shape.

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 5: Wrap a piece of twine around the top of the ball and tie it in a double knot. Continue wrapping the twine around the ball to secure the moss in place. Once the moss is secure, loop the end of the twine around a strand and tie it in place.

(Image Credit: Ashley Poskin )

Step 6: To hang the Kokedama, determine how you want the ball to hang, then tie the string to the wrapped string on the moss ball.

What plants should I pick?

When creating a Kokedama for your bathroom, fern varieties are always a great choice. Other plants to consider are: