A 545-Square-Foot Modern Rental Feels Much Larger Thanks to the Monochrome Palette

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White living room with curved bench and portrait on top of credenza
Credit: Logan Reulet

Name: Logan Reulet
Location: Downtown Salt Lake City, Utah
Type of home: Apartment
Size: 545 square feet
Years lived in: 2.5 years, renting

Tell us a little (or a lot) about your home and the people who live there: Two and a half years ago I relocated to Salt Lake from Louisville, Kentucky. I had my eye on this building after seeing old listings while researching the area. Be it fate or luck, on my first day of apartment hunting, a unit became available. I was instantly sold on the building’s character, tall ceilings, and natural light. I work in commercial photography as a stylist and art director. In my profession, I’m constantly switching gears between various styles and trends on set, so I need my home to be a sanctuary from that world. For me, that’s a space that feels a bit more timeless, filled with more personal treasures than trends.

Credit: Logan Reulet

If you saw my closet, you would definitely see the correlation. I thrive in monochrome. For me that’s a palette of white, beige, and sand tones. This also prevents me from being tied down to a particular design style. I’m drawn to decor and furniture from all sorts of eras, but as long as I stick to my palette, it tends to work out. And whether neutral or saturated, keeping a monochromatic color scheme inevitable makes a small space feel 10 times larger. So that’s an added bonus.

Credit: Logan Reulet

Describe your home’s style in 5 words or less: Collected, thoughtful, modernist.

Credit: Logan Reulet

What is your favorite room and why? Definitely the living room. When I first moved in, I defaulted to the standard setup most of us think of when furnishing a living room: Sofa, side chairs, coffee table. Done. After being in lockdown for a few months, it became painfully obvious that this wasn’t working for the way I lived. I don’t own a TV, no one was coming over, and I was primarily working from home. Things needed to change. I sold my sofa and replaced it with a vintage centipede bench. Switched out a long coffee table for a set of nesting tables that are easy to move around. For WFH, I brought in a marble bistro table paired with vintage leather dining chairs and installed a pendant light. Now the room really works for me, and it’s made a huge difference in how I interact with the space daily.

Credit: Logan Reulet

What’s the last thing you bought (or found!) for your home? The last thing I purchased was the postmodern mirror for the entry hallway. I spotted it in the Instagram story of a vintage seller (@thebeauideal) and had to have it.

Credit: Logan Reulet

Any advice for creating a home you love? Start with storage. This is particularly important in a small footprint I think. If you KNOW that you will need additional storage in a space, plan ahead for it. Maybe you know you’ll need a hutch, or a few tall bookcases, or a large armoire. Whatever it might be, working your furniture layout around casegoods is much easier than trying to come up with storage solutions after the fact.

Credit: Logan Reulet

This submission’s responses and photos were edited for length/size and clarity.