Check Out These Other Books By 2018's Most Buzzed About Authors

Check Out These Other Books By 2018's Most Buzzed About Authors

908fa00532cb0a796b7928f6471f1b36cd93370e
Samantha Zabell
Aug 27, 2018
LibraryReadingGirls
(Image credit: Lumina/Stocksy)

Whether you're on an eternal library waitlist for this year's hottest novels, or you're already through 2018's most popular books, the reading doesn't stop there. In fact, if you liked what you read this year, you'll be happy to know that many of this year's buzziest authors have written before! I've rounded up a few favorites.

If you can't stop thinking about The Immortalists, read Chloe Benjamin's Anatomy of Dreams

Benjamin's most recent novel grapples with the balance of life and death, and how four siblings choose to live when they know the exact date they are racing towards. In Anatomy of Dreams, Benjamin deals with a similarly hard-to-grasp subject—yes, dreaming. A professor and scientist builds his life's work on the idea that lucid dreaming can become a healing, therapeutic solution for doctors, but as his students soon learn, it's never that simple.

If you can't stop thinking about Red Clocks, read Leni Zumas's The Listeners

At the center of Red Clocks is five women who process grief, love, fear, and desire in many different ways as the world changes around them. The Listeners also centers around a strong, deeply flawed woman named Quinn. Her younger sister died when they were children, and twenty years later, the grief is threatening to shatter Quinn's entire existence.

If you can't stop thinking about An American Marriage, read Tayari Jones's Leaving Atlanta

With an endorsement from Oprah and, more recently, Barack Obama, Jones's examination of mass incarceration and the toll it takes on one particular couple is a must-read for the year. Jones's debut novel also takes place in Atlanta—Leaving Atlanta is set during the Atlanta Child Murders of 1980, and examines the experience through the eyes of three fifth graders who are watching their peers disappear.

If you can't stop thinking about Little Fires Everywhere, read Celeste Ng's Everything I Never Told You

Ng's Little Fires Everywhere looks at two families whose secrets and false truths are difficult to balance. In her earlier novel, Ng also looks at the way hidden lives can unravel a family, but with a much darker premise—when Lydia is found drowned, her parents begin to realize how different perception and reality is when it comes to their children.

If you can't stop thinking about The Female Persuasion, read Meg Wolitzer's The Interestings

Wolitzer's most recent novel is rich with complicated relationships and allows the reader to watch the characters develop over many years. The Interestings has that same depth—what starts as a camp friendship evolves into something much more meaningful as Wolitzer's characters navigate adulthood.

If you can't stop thinking about Clock Dance, read Anne Tyler's The Accidental Tourist

Tyler has a wealth of past novels to choose from if you're eager for more. In both Clock Dance and The Accidental Tourists, Willa and Macon (respectively) are uprooted from routine and loneliness into new neighborhoods and relationships that change the courses of their lives.

If you can't stop thinking about The Great Alone, read Kristin Hannah's Night Road

In Hannah's The Great Alone, a fractured family is unprepared for the challenges—both mental and physical—of living in a remote town in Alaska. In Night Road, Jude is unprepared for the challenges of mothering teenagers, especially when those teenagers stray into harmful situations that Jude can't control.

Apartment Therapy supports our readers with carefully chosen product recommendations to improve life at home. You support us through our independently chosen links, many of which earn us a commission.
moving--truck moving--dates moving--dolly moving--house moving--cal Created with Sketch. moving--apt